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Women’s and Girl’s HIV Awareness Day: Calling for San Diego donations

Mama's Kitchen Gay News

Join the San Diego LGBT community in collecting food donations this month for women in the greater area who suffer from HIV. Up to 94% of HIV-positive women and their families in San Diego suffer from food insecurity. They don’t know where tomorrow’s meals will come from.

The UC San Diego Antiviral Research Center invites you to participate in a food drive, March 10-19, to benefit Mama’s Kitchen.

Non-perishable food donations can be made at:

UC San Diego Antiviral Research Center
220 Dickinson Street, Suite A, San Diego, CA 92103
M-F, 8:00am – 5:00pm

Lead the Way
3830 Park Blvd, San Diego, CA 92103
M-F, Noon-8:00pm
Sat, 10:00am-4:00pm

Mama’s Pantry, a program of Mama’s Kitchen, provides a nutritional shopping opportunity at no cost for men, women and children of San Diego County affected by HIV/AIDS.

You can help by purchasing one or more items from our wish list below and dropping it in our barrel at the UC San Diego Antiviral Research Center or Lead the Way, from March 9-19:

  • canned tuna fish
  • jar of peanut butter
  • jar of jelly
  • canned salmon
  • bottle of cooking oil
  • spaghetti sauce
  • canned fruits
  • canned soups
  • canned chili
  • small box of dry milk
  • box of cereal


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Posted by LGBT Weekly on Mar 6, 2012. Filed under Online Only. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

1 Comment for “Women’s and Girl’s HIV Awareness Day: Calling for San Diego donations”

  1. Sailorman, the pot comparison messis the point.Crack is cocaine. Cocaine is crack. They are the same drug. Despite the urban myths about crack that spread in the 80s, the primary important difference between crack and cocaine is that crack is cheaper by the dose.Crack cocaine is used by blacks more than whites. Powder cocaine is used by whites more than blacks. How is it not racist to take the same damn crime using cocaine and impose sentences 100 times as high on the (nearly all) black folks as on the (nearly all) white folks?At first, sure, it could conceivably have been an innocent error. But after well over a decade of legislators refusing to budge, even though no one denies that what the laws create is a huge racial disparity in punishments for using cocaine, and even though the official sentencing commissions have recommended fixing the disparity again and again after that many years, I think the it was just an innocent error thing has stopped holding water.What you’re missing is that white people use cocaine more than black people do, but get punished much less for it. What you’re missing is that it’s unfair and racist for society to say to black people, in effect, behave this way and you can stay out of prison, when at the same time white people DON’T have to behave that way to stay out of prison.When blacks and whites face the same penalties for the same crimes in equivalent contexts, at that point what you’re saying will make sense. Not before.There’s more to it, but that’s my initial response.

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