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Scene Out: surviving a horror marathon

Scene Out

BY KIM RESCATE AND ANA PINES

We drove up to Los Angeles for the New Beverly Cinema’s 5th annual All-Night Horror Show. We didn’t know what to expect. We managed to make it through virtually all of the six movies. There were breaks in between and prior to the features; trailers of other horror classics were shown as well as a few short films. There was also a raffle after one of the movies. We didn’t get called but it was fine because the prize was for a burlesque show that would require us to drive back. Traffic in L.A. is something not to be reckoned with. It was great to see so many people come out to watch these movies, as they should be seen, on the big screen. It lasted from 7 p.m.-7:30 a.m. and we bailed out at 5:30 a.m. during the “secret movie,” The Psychic. It was announced minutes before it was screened. The movie was very good, but another cup of coffee wasn’t able to hold us up, and it was definitely time to turn in. When we left we noticed the crowd was still going strong. We were with FilmOut San Diego’s director of programming, Michael McQuiggan. FilmOut has tried to bring marathons like this to San Diego such as last year’s, Thrill-O-Rama and this year’s, Women Who Kick Ass, but our day crowd doesn’t compare to L.A.’s 4:30 a.m. crowd! Don’t LGBT San Diegan’s like movie marathons? There were plenty of LGBTs at The Beverly.

Chit-chat

The San Diego Repertory Theatre presented the Exit Interview at the Lyceum Theatre and based on the talk that followed, the show proved to be a real conversation starter. The main character Professor Richard Fig, or Dick as everyone else calls him, was in the process of his exit interview from the university. He’s against “chit-chat” and questions everything the human resources person asks. He makes you realize that people resort to mundane topics about the weather, for instance, rather than actually getting to know a person. People often shy away from topics such as political views, beliefs and thoughts about life in general. The openness and reaction by the audience made us excited to see their upcoming show, A Hammer, A Bell, And A Song To Sing which celebrates the role music has played in being part of the change in American history from the American Revolution to the civil rights movement to the Occupy protests. There will be 25 selections from multiple artists in song and spoken word.

Liberty Station: a focus for art

Andy Holmes, Malashock Bully. Photo: Amber Bliss

If you haven’t headed down to Liberty Station, you’re missing out on a plethora of art including Ballast Point Gallery, Betsy Lane and Malashock Dance to name a few. You’ll also see the familiar, Corvette Diner, which called Hillcrest home for 22 years prior to moving in 2009. Take a stroll through the galleries, have some dinner, and then catch Malashock/Raw3. Artistic Director and founder John Malashock, Associate Artistic Director Michael Mizerany and guest choreographer Regina Klenjoski have created three unique emotional pieces that are sure to resonate with many of you.

Klenjoski brought into question whether relationships that have been broken can ever be repaired to what they once were. Malashock’s piece delved into the chaoticness of life and those moments where things don’t seem to go your way. Mizerany’s story entitled, Bully coincides with this month’s anti-bullying awareness campaign. It was a beautifully done piece; the choreography successfully contained tension throughout and created an emotional connection with the audience. Mizerany inserted a little bit of humor toward the end which received a spontaneous positive reaction from the crowd.

 

 

 

 



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Posted by Associate Editor on Oct 25, 2012. Filed under Bottom Highlights, Online Only, Scene Out. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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