The talk

Social Chaos: Bill's Briefs

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TV programs now feature teen pregnancies and schools offer kindergartens. We seniors remember girls suddenly going to live with grandma, their names never to be mentioned. Obviously, they had ignored “the talk” which I encountered in the 6th grade. First, the girls were sent to the nurses’ room for a mysterious enlightenment and then we boys received a lecture titled, “Manhood.” The “Parentally Approved” expert (a local pastor) proceeded with a mouth-foaming rant about the devil controlling our hand. Then followed a movie with stick figures, dogs humping each other (!) and a mother in a hospital bed, every hair in place, smiling and cradling a baby. It all ended with a final harangue about our filthy hand, a prayer to save us from the temptations of the Evil One and a plea to respect our mothers “for what they’d been through.” Since my mother had not been through anything more than a nasty lobster bite, I left the room in a daze.

The girls had received a similar commentary and threats of eternal damnation. One girl said it was about their aunt visiting every month which brought screams of laughter from her friends. Naturally, we boys pretended to get the joke. Later, we decided it had all been about babies, but a friend had already informed me how your car thing goes in the girl’s garage thing and then angels bring a baby.

This other stuff was most confusing, but no complaints, it got us out of a history test. At home mother averted her eyes and said if I had any questions about “the talk,” I was to ask my father.

His advice was succinct and irrefutable: Boys, hands in pockets. Girls, legs crossed. Can’t go wrong with that.

All ages welcome

As people of all ages live and learn, the joy of reading never ends. We are especially grateful when what we read is in some way related to the LGBT experience. Gratefully, we note the recent increase in the acceptance of our lifestyles which has considerably enlarged our choices. On the other hand, many seniors in our community cannot get over the closet days and are hesitant to let their reading material be known, embarrassed to examine a particular book in a library or reluctant to stand in front of a store’s LGBT section.

Joining them, the young and questioning are equally uneasy about publicly searching for information and novels which they can relate to and which confirm they are not alone. Also there are parents and friends exploring ways to address a family issue. Luckily there is a private, discrete place where help is available: the Bruce Abrams Lending Library right here in our wonderful LGBT Center.

There you will find thousands of books connected to our various lifestyles, people, movements, etc. Everything is covered: serious studies, fiction, non-fiction, parental advice, self-acceptance, biographies, children’s books, even some DVDs. All conveniently arranged and labeled in sections. The price is reasonable: free.

Get a card from the front desk, make your selections and check out up to four books for one month. It is a fantastic bargain and an invaluable asset to our community. Check it out and check them out.



Short URL: http://lgbtweekly.com/?p=61202

Posted by on Jun 11, 2015. Filed under Bottom Highlights, Bill's Briefs. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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